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Timber Frame Joints

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This example illustrates a very common assembly in timber framing. That is when a post connects to a tie beam (a horizontal beam, perpendicular to the ridge, that resists the spreading force of the roof onto the walls) or a plate.

Cross Lap Joint Exploded Interior

Cross Lap Joint

Cross lap joints are a great solution when you want to create clean, continuous lines in a timber frame. The edges of the joint are completely flush, making it almost appear that the timbers are magically connected. To create a cross lap joint, you cut halfway through the width of both timbers that you are connecting , and they slide together into an extremely solid joint.

Under Squinted Stop Splayed Scarf Joint With Screws

Under Squinted Stop Splayed Scarf Joint With Screws

Often the length of a span in a timber frame is longer than the size of your lumber. That is when you will need to use a scarf joint to join two timbers together. There are many types of scarf joints, and this under squinted stop splayed scarf joint with screws is one of them.

Under squinted Half Lap Joint

Under Squinted Half Lap Joint

The beauty of the simple lap joint is the ease in cutting it, as it is merely two timbers reduced to half of their thickness where they lap over each other. This provides a face-grain-to-face-grain joint with a good amount of connecting surface.

Under Squinted Stop Splayed Scarf Joint With Pegs

Under Squinted Stop Splayed Scarf Joint With Pegs

The scarf joint is indispensable in timber framing when you need to span a length greater than your lumber is long. The scarf joint enables you to join timbers end to end, and there are many variations of this type of joint. In this under squinted stop splayed scarf joint with pegs,

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