TimberLinx Post Base Detail

timber linx post base connection-7


This is one of my favorite ways to secure a timbered post to concrete.  It uses a TimberLinx Connector with a piece of 7/8″ galvanized all thread rod that has been epoxied into the concrete.  This allows you to adjust the exact placement of the connector after the concrete has been poured and not while the concrete is being poured.  The connector has good uplift and shear values, is easy to install and the cheapest method available that allows you to hide the connector completely.

There are a couple downsides and issues that do crop up.  The first is that you have to lay out the placement of the all thread exactly and have it plumb before the epoxy dries to insure proper alignment with the posts and connectors.  The second is to have the holes drilled properly for the TimberLinx Connectors, otherwise the expanding wedge connector may not align correctly.  While these are considerations…just think it through , measure three times and then have someone check your work.

Click Images for Slide Show and Larger Images

, ,

8 Responses to TimberLinx Post Base Detail

  1. zig November 17, 2016 at 6:52 am #

    I’ve used Timerlinx before for this application, but I can’t remember what type of epoxy we used — do you have a recommendation?

  2. Anthony December 31, 2017 at 1:02 pm #

    Two questions:
    1. What are you using for the red standoff in the diagrams? Currently I’m planning to use stainless fender washers secured with roofing nails, but am not exactly in love with the concept
    2. Why do your drawings show dowels in both sides of the post? You only need to enter from one side and go a couple inches past center.

    Thanks – love the website!

    • Brice Cochran December 31, 2017 at 5:39 pm #

      Thanks Anthony,
      The red spacer in the drawings can be a piece of lexan, a Simpson CPS Stand Off Base, it separates the concrete from the post end grain.
      The extra blind peg is a personal choice. I like the symmetry of having it on two sides as it matches a timber frame with traditional pegged holes.
      Happy new year!

      • Anthony January 2, 2018 at 8:44 am #

        Thanks for the reply! I like the Lexan idea. What thickness would you use and how much smaller than the post dimensions would you cut it? I see that 1/8, 3/16, 1/4 thicknesses are readily available. Happy new year to you too!

  3. NIck January 18, 2018 at 11:35 am #

    Hey Brice. Have you ever used the connector for attaching a handrail newel to a 4″ concrete pad? We are planning to use 6×6 western red cedar posts and want to make sure the newel will remain rigid over time. I thought of leaving more length on the all thread so the connector would be higher up in the post. Any thoughts? Thanks!

Leave a Reply