Reading plans

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Brice Cochran Brice Cochran 2 hours, 36 minutes ago.

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  • #19885
    Mike Mitchell
    Mike Mitchell
    Participant

    I’ve been a diy  woodworker for 20 + years and have done lots of home renovations / building projects.  I bought a small chainsaw mill last year with the idea that I could cut my own lumber and try my hand at timber framing some small projects.  My wood is still drying but I purchased some timbers at a local mill to get things jump started, found this great site and I’m excited and ready to try and build the timber frame saw horses based on the TF HQ plans.

    I expected some challenges learning TF skills – but never expected to get stuck on reading the plans !!   Based on the timber listing at the top of the plan, I thought the top of the horses was 48″.  Looking at the detail drawings, it seems like they are 36″ .  I’m also having trouble figuring out how long the tenons are supposed to be.

    Feeling kind of clueless right now, but I’ll put “how to read a plan” down as a new skill I need to learn.  Is this a common problem for newbies?

    Thanks for any help / pointers you can provide.

     

     

    #19985
    James Bailey
    jbailey
    Participant

    so the timber inventory list will typically be longer than the actual timbers cut to length.  This is so you have some extra inches to cut out knots and other defects.

    But you are correct that reading timber plans is complex.  This is because the pieces themselves are complex, much more so than stud framing material.  Keep at it and the ‘reading skill’ will come.

    Also, I’m not sure your plan to dry your timber is necessary or even desirable – especially if its oak, which will harden a good bit as it dries.

     

     

     

     

    #19998
    Mike Mitchell
    Mike Mitchell
    Participant

    Thanks for the feedback.  I think I’ve figured out the saw horse plans and I’ve started to work on my first TF joint.  In the course of buying some timbers and tools, I’ve come across some guys that have some experience and each one of them has given me similar advice about working with “wet”  wood.   Not what I’m used to, but that’s why I’m trying something new.  It’s great to have a resource like this to get help.

     

     

    #20063
    Brice Cochran
    Brice Cochran
    Keymaster

    Sorry I have been absent, been taking some time off.  Did you you get everything sorted out dimension wise?  Let me know if you need any help.

    #20064
    Brice Cochran
    Brice Cochran
    Keymaster

    Sorry I have been absent, been taking some time off.  Did you you get everything sorted out dimension wise?  Let me know if you need any help.

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