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This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Jim Rogers Jim Rogers 1 week, 5 days ago.

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  • #21800
    Erik Cohen
    Ecohen
    Participant

    Hello everyone. I’m also new to timber framing. I recently moved to Virginia and got some land with timber on it. I’m looking to start with a potting/green house. Then moving on to rebuilding an old barn on the property.

    One question I have is, does anyone have an effective way of making pins? I’ve tried hammering rough cut pieces through a sharpened steel pipe, but I find the pins get stuck and it takes more work to get them out than its worth. Thanks

     

    -Erik

    #21812
    Jim Rogers
    Jim Rogers
    Moderator

    I usually shape my pegs/pins using a shaving horse and a draw knife. Some people use a plank with a groove cut in it to hold the stock and use a plane to shape the peg/pin.

    Roughing them out with a table saw is a good way to get them down to nearly correct size, but be careful of cross grain.

    Good luck with your projects.

    Jim Rogers

    #21821
    Brice Cochran
    Brice Cochran
    Keymaster

    This is not a very traditional way of making them…but I like the look of an octagonal peg.  Cut them all on a table saw.  The key is to test the size of the peg to hole to make sure they fit well.

    #21829
    Jim Rogers
    Jim Rogers
    Moderator

    Making pegs

    above is using a plank with a groove cut in it to hold the blank and the student is shaving down the peg edges with a block plane.

    Below is a student using a shaving horse with a draw knife:

    Shaving horse making pegs

    Jim Rogers

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