Getting started

This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Brice Cochran Brice Cochran 4 months, 2 weeks ago.

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  • #18466
    alexandre circe
    alexandre circe
    Participant

    Hi there,

    As my title said, I want to think step by step. I’m looking forward to work wood but in a project like building a home, talking about joinery isn’t everything.

    Nothing can’t be changed, I’m open to any of your comment, I gathered some informations but still want your advices.

    The first thing is choosing a site on my land. I have something in mind, it’t beautiful, up in mountain not to far from running water e.t.c…it is straight on rock, witch I think i like. A huge cap of rock(mountain) and at this very place there is not much cleaning with pressurized water to expose a clean surface.

    1) The plan is to have a water radiant floor. So here is my questions: In a case like this. Is the concrete poured right on the rock? I heard about using 0 to 3\4 rock under the concrete to let the water go.

    Is the technique is pouring the circumference wall and pillar inside where the post will be, then raising the timber frame and when everything is closed, compact the dirt, 6mm plastic sheet, foam, tubing and 4 inch of concrete.

    Or just making the final polish and heating surface before even thinking about raising.

    2) I saw the alumni anchor that can fasten the post with the concrete just by defining where the post should be and use concrete screw, but I also red that other people would fix a plate in the concrete and then weld the frame once completely raise, that way you can square it after rather than assuming everything will be perfect. Witch option do you prefer?

    3) It’s a projet for a couple a years, in the next week I will cut trees to make an access. All the wood for the house will be from my land and I heard that it is better to work with green wood. I am assuming that everything I cut will torn if I mill it in timber now?..should I oversize it and remill it square when ready, or should I juste make plank out of it and think about my timber when building time will come?

    Thanks for your time and your expertise I hope.

    #18484
    Brice Cochran
    Brice Cochran
    Keymaster

    See below for my thoughts…

    1- Not ever having built on a solid rock I will have to defer to others, but I would think that the footers can go right on the rock but it seems to me that you would want gravel underneath it.  If the mountain ever moves slightly you will notice it in the slab.

    2- I like both methods, but prefer the timberlinx connectors for the concrete to timber connection.  The welded one gives you complete flexibility, but a timber frame by nature is a pretty exact thing and so the foundation connection is just as exact as the rest of your frame will be.

    3- It is easier to work with it green but you will get a better result with less checking, twisting and shrinkage using dry wood.  The heart of a log is best suited for a timber so I say start milling them up (I started milling logs 3 years before starting to cut my frame).  If they are hardwoods then I would oversize them and resaw them when you are ready.  It is a lot of work but you will get great results.

    #18565
    alexandre circe
    alexandre circe
    Participant

    Excellent and thanks for the quick answer. So about the timber, I red your guide ‘’creating a timber frame house’’, very constructive by the way, but I notice that in the Wood section you dont talk about red pine at all. Is there a structural reason to that or just not a popular option.

    Other question, if the wood is to be cut, red pine if possible if not white pine, would you cut it to its final size even if you wont cut any joinery for a year or more. And would you just let it air dry with spacer between beams, I dont mind checking but twisting or curving wouldn’t ruin it?

    Thank you, soon it will be time to fall some trees, just want to be sure witch ones.

    #18566
    Brice Cochran
    Brice Cochran
    Keymaster

    Red pine is just not as common as some of the others in the article.  Red pine is great to use.  I would cut them to the final size and cut down on your material handling.  If it were oak my answer would be different.

    #18801
    alexandre circe
    alexandre circe
    Participant

    Excellent, a big thanks Brice, lots of trees down, I kept them in full length and brought them closer to the mill for later. Now it’s time to choose a plan. I had in mind since the last 6 years a little saltbox timber frame. I love the fact that the roof is on the largest side of the building.

    My problem is my girlfriend, it seem that she would like it a bit bigger. The design I talk about is from the book a timber framer workshop. I also like it because of it simplicity for a first project.

    I just used sketch up for some layout and in the end the perfect size will be something 18×26. Do you think this is stupid to stretch it that far (0riginal is 16×22). The tie beams will be a bit less than 26 feet, each purlin a bit more than 17 feet, is it too long for a single piece of wood (twisting or weak point). I have the trees and I have the mill and the extension but I don’t see a lot of single piece more than 20 feet’s on plans I guess there’s a reason, hope it’s juste the milling.

    Also, having a saltbox and a 26 feet wide roof will put a lot of tension in the joinery, I was thinking of usin steel tensioner over de brace on the loft beams. Having the frame stetched out make more room on the second floor so I can lower the tensioner tie, I guess it’s a good news.

    So I know I should call an engeneer and make everything perfect but the thruth is that there is not a lot a professional around here and they don’t like to works on others plans. In your experience, do you think the length make the project unrealistic or the structrure will be too weak, should I over size de 10×7 is stretching a bit less is an option e.c.t.

    Finally don’t be rude but be honest thanks.

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    #18914
    Brice Cochran
    Brice Cochran
    Keymaster

    The tie beam can be as long as you need in tension, however, if you are loading it them up with direct roof load you just need to watch your spacing with your mid span post.  You are correct in thinking this beam may twist and bow.  Looks ok in your drawing to me.

    I think you are pushing it with your purlin length and your rafter size.

    I like the steel tension rods, but if you convert it to a king post with a structural ridge and common rafters from purlins you eliminate all the outward thrust.

    There may not be engineers in your area that will help you out, but you can find one that is licensed in your state at https://timberframehq.com/timber-frame-engineering/.  I think you will find one there that can help you out with just the beam sizing.  It is well worth the money, knowing my house is 100%, will brave any storm and will last through the next couple of hundred years is comforting to say the least.

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