Tenon

Double Tenoned Scarf Joint (7 of 8)

Double Tenoned Scarf Joint

In this joinery example, we are detailing two variations of this double tenoned scarf joint.  The first uses a hardwood wedge to drive the two pieces together and the other uses pegs.   If you want or need a better method you can opt to use structural screws in place of the pegs.  Both offer a […]

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mortise-and-tenon-through-tenon

Through Tenon With a Wedge

When a timber frame load exerts outward thrust on this through tenon with a wedge, the force is well resisted and kept in check. The wedge draws the joint tighter, adding extra strength that you could not get with just pegs. The end of the tenon is rounded in this example, which is called an […]

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t-rex post and beam connector

The Difference Between Timber Framing and Post and Beam

What is the difference between timber framing and post and beam? Many people have a hard time distinguishing between the two methods of building with heavy timbers.  Primarily the difference is with the connections. Timber Connections Timber framing is a method used by our forefathers and their ancestors, who brought with them the skills used in Europe and other countries for centuries. Using traditional wooden joinery to […]

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Timbered Rafter to Collar Tie Connection with Pegs

Collar Tie to Rafter Connection

More likely than not, the joinery in the roof system of a timber frame is often loaded with tension and so special consideration is needed to make sure everything is held together.  In this detail we show a collar tie to rafter connection in two ways. The first, and often preferred, method used by engineers employs pieces of all thread and extra large […]

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Mortise and Tenon with Wedge

Wedged Mortise and Tenon Joint

This  mortise and tenon joint uses a wedge in conjunction with a tapered tenon and mortise to hold itself together giving you a clean looking connection.  The key in this joint’s strength is to have all the bearing surfaces between the post, wedge and tenon fit perfectly.  The wedge’s large surface faces outwards towards the housing side […]

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