16×24 Timber Frame Plan

16x24 Timber Frame PlanThis versatile plan could be finished out as a storage shed, a picnic pavilion or even a glamping cabin.  It measures 16’ wide by 24’ deep, with two generous bays. Enclose the entire structure, or enjoy part of it as a delightful porch. The plate height of 9’10” creates a roomy interior. Generous gable-end overhangs make a strong statement.

The drawings include 26 sheets, including renderings, timber schedule, plan, elevation and sectional drawings along with all the piece and joinery details you will need to build this small timber frame. Formatted in instantly-downloadable PDF  for 8 ½” x 11’ paper.

While the plan has an 8″ roof pitch by default we have added the dimensions for 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 inch roof pitches to allow you the option to choose. in this set of plans.

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Important Information:

Purchaser agrees that the use of the plan is for the construction of one house or frame only*, and that the plan or any part of it will not be reproduced by any means without the written consent of the copyright owner.

Timber Frame HQ provides plans for construction purposes but does not oversee the construction. The plan purchaser is responsible for assuring the plan meets local codes and regulations. It is the responsibility of the plan purchaser to obtain any and all structural analysis, engineering and specifications that may be required in the municipality in which it is to be built. Plan purchaser is to verify all lot conditions and measurements before construction. Purchaser is responsible for additional expenses incurred in order to meet local code and engineering requirements.

Customer understands that the following conditions in your specific area may require additional engineering:

  1. Wind / hurricane / tornado
  2. Seismic / earthquake
  3. Heavy snow
  4. Flood potential
  5. Soil instability
  6. Timber Frame Engineering

Customer understands that HVAC, Plumbing & Electrical will not be included in all plans.
Purchaser agrees that the use of the plan is for the construction of one house or frame only*, and that the plan or any part of it will not be reproduced by any means without the written consent of the copyright owner.

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38 Responses to 16×24 Timber Frame Plan

  1. Mike January 2, 2016 at 10:01 am #

    Can this plan be extended to 16’x48′?

    • Brice Cochran January 2, 2016 at 6:38 pm #

      Yes, you can easily double the plan or we can work with you to customize this plan.

  2. Dan Corkey February 25, 2016 at 12:06 am #

    Hello,

    What is the height from floor to bottom of cross beam? Thanks!

    Dan

    • Brice Cochran February 25, 2016 at 3:00 am #

      It is 7’8 and you can raise it by adding to the posts.

    • Dan Corkey June 4, 2016 at 8:30 am #

      I have lots of tulip poplar on my land, is that a sufficient wood for timber framing?

      • Brice Cochran June 4, 2016 at 9:08 am #

        It sure is. It is not very common because it is not very strong but as long as you know that going into it and take it into account with the beam sizing you should be ok.

  3. Brian Swan March 7, 2016 at 5:50 am #

    What dimension are the posts and cross beams?

    • Brice Cochran March 7, 2016 at 11:43 pm #

      16x24 Timber Frame Plan

      • Sam July 19, 2016 at 3:51 pm #

        Is this the full timber list (if I wanted to go and see what estimated cost of materials might be)?

        • Brice Cochran July 19, 2016 at 10:32 pm #

          It is a complete timber list. You will need to get screws and decide on a post to concrete connection, see them at http://timberframehq.com/construction-details/masonryconcrete-to-timber/ but other than that you should be good to go. On the timber list, I generally add a couple of feet of extra length to the timbers, in case they come to you a little short or if you want to move the piece up or down on the timber to avoid a knot or something.

  4. bob March 20, 2016 at 2:10 pm #

    Will these plans be used for steel framing instead of lumber, or would adjustments be needed to be valid from a structural / engineering perspective?

    • Brice Cochran March 21, 2016 at 10:56 pm #

      They can be converted without much trouble, I do think that the size of the steel will not have to be as large as what is posted for the timber sizes.

  5. pete toppan March 21, 2016 at 9:24 pm #

    What is the interior clearance between the posts? I’m considering this as a boat shed but the trailer has to be accommodated. Thanks

    • Brice Cochran March 21, 2016 at 10:59 pm #

      The posts measure 7 1/2″ x 7 1/2″ and there is 14’9″ clearance between the posts. Would be a great home for a boat.

  6. Brock O'Brien March 30, 2016 at 5:43 am #

    How about 20’x24′ or 24’x24′ Timber Frame Plans? that’s same kind

    • Brice Cochran March 31, 2016 at 12:10 am #

      We don’t have anything ready. We are working on a 20′ king post plan currently. In order to make this wider you would need to add a post or two to help carry the roof loads.

  7. john nelson April 27, 2016 at 4:24 pm #

    Brice, beautiful plans and a great website. In my part of the country (Connecticut), older frames contain timbers of dimensions rarely exceeding 8 x 8, perhaps 8 x 9 or 10 for larger plates…
    Before I consult an engineer, can you comment on the feasibility of substituting these dimensions for the 12x material in your 16 x 24 frame? Thank you.

    • Brice Cochran April 29, 2016 at 6:24 pm #

      Thanks John,
      That frame was originally designed for white pine so if you were going to use something stronger than that, say white oak or Doug fir then yes I think you can use 8×10’s. The piece that is carrying the most loads is the tie beam that spans between the post. So if you keep anyone an 8×12 it would be those members.

  8. Mike May 21, 2016 at 5:07 pm #

    How tall could you concievably raise the posts?

    • Brice Cochran May 22, 2016 at 8:36 am #

      You could go fairly height with them, thinking about adding a loft?

  9. jim McCauley May 25, 2016 at 2:59 pm #

    Bruce, I want to build a 36×16 open pavilion on my pool deck. I want to match the house roof pitch which is 12/12. I need to build it on a budget. I live in Greenville SC so lumber is available. I am thinking white pine would be the cheapest. Can I adapt this plan to my needs?
    thanks, Jim

    • Brice Cochran May 26, 2016 at 9:35 am #

      It would be quite easy to add another bay to the frame by duplicating the middle posts joinery. Because the frame will be outdoors I would recommend cypress if that is cost prohibitive, I would at least use cypress posts to help prevent rot.

  10. Bob Hallowell July 26, 2016 at 10:07 pm #

    Would you be able to build this out of treated lumber?
    Thanks
    Bob

    • Brice Cochran July 27, 2016 at 8:42 am #

      You can make it from treated material but that type of wood tends to be hard, squirrely and you will need to wear a dust mask at a minimum to cut the joinery out of it. It is 8x material so you will need to custom order it anyway. I would recommend that you find a local sawyer that can get you a natural rot resistant wood such as cedar, cypress, white oak or even doug fir.

  11. Robin October 1, 2016 at 12:37 pm #

    What special tools would I need to cut out the joinery

  12. Kristian Olauson January 21, 2017 at 10:53 am #

    What is the roof pitch of this frame?

    • Brice Cochran January 21, 2017 at 11:39 am #

      This plan has an 8″ roof pitch in the images however, we have added the dimensions for 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12 inch roof pitches to allow you the option to choose.

  13. Joshua Halloran January 22, 2017 at 1:01 pm #

    Two questions, what do you recommend for enclosure methods due to the distance between posts, and have you ever used southern yellow pine for your timber material? How easy/ difficult is it work with? Thanks, josh

    • Brice Cochran January 23, 2017 at 1:14 pm #

      I have worked with yellow pine before, in fact my office is a yellow pine frame. It’s main downside is that it twists and bows a lot depending on where it is grown. It is strong though. I would recommend a stick frame shell on the outside of the frame and a SIP roof.

  14. Tmarkh March 4, 2017 at 11:13 pm #

    Can this be modified to 20′ x 24′? And maybe with an attached lean-to “carport”?

  15. Steve March 22, 2017 at 1:26 pm #

    Could this design be modified to 16′ x 26′ or 16′ x 28′ ?, could it be built with a floor like your timber frame shed design instead of a concrete base ?

    • Brice Cochran April 2, 2017 at 9:31 am #

      Yes you can easily modify them for the additional length but adding 1′ to 2′ to either side of the pavilion. Let me know what length you decide and we will help you sort out the rafter spacing.

  16. John April 1, 2017 at 5:56 pm #

    Do you have a design with four posts on a side, separating the interior into 3 8 ft section?

    • Brice Cochran April 2, 2017 at 9:34 am #

      No we do not have one with 4 posts on each side but it would be easily for you to convert it, adding 1 set of posts.

  17. Mark April 23, 2017 at 1:01 pm #

    What is the dimension across from rafter tip to rafter tip. Looking to cover a 25′ X 20′ patio.

    • Brice Cochran April 24, 2017 at 3:42 pm #

      The over on the frame is 2 feet. So with the overhang the frame is 20’x 26′. Easy to make the modification to adjust for your project.

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